Home > Europe, Global Finance, India, Indian Economy, Indian media, Politics, World Economy > NASSCOM wakes up after 15 months

NASSCOM wakes up after 15 months


A team of researchers including professors of University of Brighton published a report in July 2009 titled “Crime online — Cybercrime and illegal innovation”. It was picked up by online news channels and quoted in news items to propagate lies about so-called cybercrimes in the business process outsourcing (BPO) industry of India. The report tries to present data from the annual reports of the Indian Computer Emergency Team, and Symantec in a way that suits its story, of India being a centre of cybercrimes and in general being a weak state. (via Phishing study: Bunch of lies).

Plodders – all of you!

I got bad news for you, Mr. Kamlesh Bajaj!

Nasscom, your team and maybe you should include yourself. Plodders! All! The report you quote came out in July – and you are responding to it it after 3 months. What more, if you had dug deeper, you would have come out with more – dirt, that is.

The ‘prequel’

Nearly 15 months ago, a Scottish newspaper, The Sunday Herald ‘revealed’ that an Indian hacker had broken into the credit card database and stolen some 8 million records. The supposed ‘victim’, Best Western Hotel immediately rejected this claim, and revealed that 10 (ten only) records had been stolen. If you check this story today, The Sunday Herald has (of course), removed the Best Western rebuttal of this story. How did the newspaper identify the nationality of the hacker? A journalist’s ‘secret’ sources!

Indian Media

The serious part of the story was that only a few (all from the largest media house in India, in fact) Indian newspapers picked up this story. No other significant newspaper in the world picked it up. India’s premier business newspaper The Economic Times featured this story prominently in their print edition. The Times of India, which says it the largest English newspaper, dutifully carried this IANS report. The challenger to Times Of India, DNA also carried this report. Looking at these reports just a little deeper, and the source of all these reports is a IANS (India Abroad News Service) report.

So, it was evidently planted and created for the Indian media. The story was dated August 23rd, 2008, Saturday, and carried the next day, on a Sunday for maximum impact – and for the business press to pick up and run the story on Monday morning. The story was planted through IANS, a supposed ‘pro-Indian’ news agency. Did anyone come back and retract this story? Of course, not!

Every aspect of this hoax was planned in great detail.

Within the next 3 days, on August 27, 2008 the 2ndlook blog uncovered this hoax ‘Indian hacker’ story. The prequel to the report that you are rebutting after 3 months. The secret – the ‘provincial’ mind’ (aka मोटी, देसी और मंद बुद्धि) of 2ndlook knows …

What they don’t know …

What these English speaking, Westernized journos, dont know and cant care about are some inconvenient facts. How can India have a low prison population, with a poor police-to-population ratio and a crime rate which is not above the average – in spite of a large civilian gun population.

All the 5 indices (below) create a bias for a lawless Indian society and rampant crime. With these five indices, going against a stable social system, how does current day India manage low-to-average crime rates.

  1. India has the lowest per capita prison population in the world. (‘put more criminals behind bars’)
  2. India also has the lowest police-to-population ratio in the world. (‘increase police force’)
  3. India has the second highest national gun stock in the world. (‘more guns means more crime’)
  4. India has the largest number of poor in the world. (‘it is poverty which the root of all crime’)
  5. Capital punishment in India is again at low levels. (‘kill enough criminals to instill fear’)

Western thinking and systems of law and order predict that India should have the highest crime rate in the world – which is not true. India has low-to-average crime rate compared to the Rest of the World.

Historically, trade in India is governed by शुभ लाभ ‘shubh labh’ – and hence Indians have not been major players in drugs proliferation (unlike Japan, the West in which traded Opium in Korea and China) or in slave trade. In modern times, though India is a power in computing industry, India is not a big player in spamming or in software virus.

Indian ethical system

More than 2000 years ago, Megasthenes a Greek traveller to India wrote,

Theft is of very rare occurrence. Megasthenes says that those who were in the camp of Sandrakottos, wherein lay 400,000 men, found that the thefts reported on any one day did not exceed the value of two hundred drachmae, and this among a people who have no written laws

Interesting it is. Surprising it is not!

  1. Aashish Singh
    November 7, 2009 at 10:40 pm

    Namaskar Anuraagji,

    As usual interesting post. However i would like to argue on the crime rate part.

    Western societies ‘have a very limited structure in their culture, created by their religion’. This structure actually comes from the religion in India and acts as a personal law (“Dharma”, “Karma”).

    A religion should not just seclude its followers to the worship of the Lord. Pray to the Lord, give donations in the name of the Lord, or act as to what has been written for you, by the Lord.

    Religion in western societies and middle eastern countries (I exclude ‘Judaism’ from this list, though) were/are more or less used to purposefully gather the follower under a common umbrella. Though the religion followed there do have some teachings for the society, but than how thorough the human philosophy has been thought and understood to establish those teachings and how old the civilization is which is following those teaching and how much relevant those philosophies remains as the time progresses (otherwise like old Pentium processors they will be outdated) are some of the many features of the religion(s) which creates the required structure in the society and instills the personal unwritten laws amongst its citizens.

    Proudly, Sanatan Dharma builds this structure of the society and personal unwritten laws for us. Evey Bhartiye has his/her own personal court of law which is developed right from the early childhood by the parents, grandparent and the society based on many unspoken religious philosophies which were established in VEDAS, UPANISHADS, GEETA and other Hindu scriptures and is being passed from generations to generations and which were true when they were first established, they are true now and will remain true forever as well. Though we may turn away from them, following the change in time (read following West) but those lofty teachings and philosophy can never be termed wrong.

    So that’s the reason why we call Sanatan Dharma (Hindusm) as a way of life and not a religion. See we have Dharma (Righteous way of act). I don’t know what is the exact Sanskrit fit for the word RELIGION. West call their teaching of God etc as religion and they have equated Hindusim to it as well. Saying that Hinduism is the “Religion” of India and we are following them in calling our “Dharmaa” as “Religion” (Just because it has been accepted by the demoralized Bhartiye to follow them in every sense). However this isn’t the case, we do not have any religion in fact. It the teaching of the VEDAS and other holy scriptures which are followed only partly now (and that’s why we are becoming corrupt society). But that is what it is with us, which gives personal unwritten laws, passed from generations to generations.

    However, the present state of affairs (in terms of Judicial system) in India is not something to be proud of. If murderers, criminal sit in abundance in the Parliament of the country, than it indicates the sluggishness, unfairness, meekness and failure of the judicial system to put criminals behind bars.

    Out of over a Billion people we have less than 1000 people who sits in the highest office of the country (Parliament). If majority of them have criminal records, with some being gruesome bandits than it indicates the state of the affairs of our judicial system and point to the direction as to what percentage of the commons must be criminals who must be roaming scot free in the society, just because of the ineffectiveness of the judicial system.

    Further, in India ‘majority’ of the petty issues/cases are dealt/resolved at the personal or mutual basis. For eg. borrow car/or bike of your neighbor and accidental damage it, say scratch it. All we have to do is say “Sorry” or we get it fixed by ourself, and the neighbor most likely say, “Koi bat nahin” (though his heart weeps), or may be he’ll shout at us, or whatever, but never ever i have heard such matters being taken to court.
    Another example, if you live in a rented apartment in India, then either the tenants sometime stupidly damage the property in some way, there will be a fight amongst the land lord and the tenants which will be resolved by the neighbors, or may at mutual levels, but never such matters will be pulled to court.
    Sometimes tenants keep requesting (for months) to their landlord to get something fixed in the house, and the landlord doesn’t give a damn about it, “Jane de, kaam chal raha hai, kya lafde karna” attitude works.

    In western societies people rarely resolve such matters at the personal or mutual level, i have seen several litigation where court orders repayment of petty damages worth $50, $100. Yes these are in abundance and very frequent.

    When i think petty cases like these being reported and taken to the Court of law by the people, in India, all i can imagine is our judicial system coming crashing down on its knees in a matter of few “hours” and Over half of the Indians sitting in the jail for some crime or the other.

    So all in all, there is a balance in both types of societies. Be it in West or in India.

    In West they do not have much support from religion, but their have built their judicial system in a way to resolve the dispute in the society.

    In India the ineffectiveness of our judicial system is being compensated by the personal and mutual level attitude and supported further by the Dharma. The attitude of Indians in keeping patience and tolerating and bearing pain and sorrow at the personal level (mitti daal). et. etc. etc.

    On the finishing note, we should work to uplift the judiciary, police etc and at the same time detest the western culture and instill the Vedaic knowledege, Study of Vedas, Geeta, Upanishads, Astang Yoga, Sanskrit language should be made compulsory on scholls and should continue till class 12th, and should be practiced in the society.

    Best Regards
    Aashish Singh

  2. November 8, 2009 at 9:29 am

    Religion in western societies and middle eastern countries (I exclude ‘Judaism’ from this list, though) were/are more or less used to purposefully gather the follower under a common umbrella.

    And that umbrella was slavery!

    how much relevant those philosophies remains as the time progresses (otherwise like old Pentium processors they will be outdated) are some of the many features of the religion(s) which creates the required structure in the society and instills the personal unwritten laws amongst its citizens.

    They remain very relevant! These cultures have never gven up on slavery – except for short times, when it was no longer possible to keep slaves.

    Sanatan Dharma builds this structure of the society and personal unwritten laws for us.

    The laws, principles and guidelines are written down in about 1000 texts and scriptures. The most common guielines are purushartha – Dharma (the path of righteousness), arth (money), kaam (desires), moksha (freedom).

    Evey Bhartiye has his/her own personal court of law which is developed right from the early childhood by the parents, grandparent and the society based on many unspoken religious philosophies which were established in VEDAS, UPANISHADS, GEETA and other Hindu scriptures and is being passed from generations to generations

    Yes – the concept of dharma is very individual – very sookshma. Very fine and very thin. Which is why Indian do not demonize people. Demons are humanized. In Ramayana, remember, Ravana is humanized – and not demonized!

    I don’t know what is the exact Sanskrit fit for the word RELIGION

    Religion is Maaya – Illusion. Propaganda. A tool for the rich and powerful to enslave the poor and weak.

    West call their teaching of God etc as religion and they have equated Hindusim to it as well.

    Very correct – Religion and dharma are vastly different.

    Out of over a Billion people we have less than 1000 people who sits in the highest office of the country (Parliament). If majority of them have criminal records, with some being gruesome bandits than it indicates the state of the affairs of our judicial system and point to the direction as to what percentage of the commons must be criminals who must be roaming scot free in the society, just because of the ineffectiveness of the judicial system.

    The situation calls for a different reading – different from what you are saying. Indian response to crime and criminals is different!!

    Further, in India ‘majority’ of the petty issues/cases are dealt/resolved at the personal or mutual basis.

    Is there any other way that these things can get resolved? Is an expensive judiciary the way to do it?

    In more than 1000 Indic books, claiming to record more than 10,000 years of history, there is no instance of any dispute reaching the King. The longest ancient epic in the world, The Mahabharata has no incident where a private dispute reached Yudhisthir (though a mongoose could lecture the King about sacrifices and yagnas). There was never any case of private dispute, recorded in the Ramayana, that reached Ramachandra (though a dhobi could ‘inform’ the king about bazaar talk regarding the Queen Sita). Even a poor Brahman, Kautsa, could reach King Raghu for help in the disbursal of guru-dakshina गुरु-दक्षिणा. (Read more at Indic Justice – The need to rediscover or reinvent?).

    Is it that Indians were ‘saints’ and did not have private disputes? Were they so civilized that they could solve all disputes by talking to each other? Is it that Indian kings were not bothered about delivery of justice!

    On the finishing note, we should work to uplift the judiciary, police etc

    I can assure you that any number of policemen /courts /judges will not be enough.

    In the US they have now what is called Internal Affairs – policemen who police over the police. With time, there will be some people who will watch over the internal affairs. It is an eternally vicious circle. Justice has to be local, immediate and permanent.

    Excess laws are like road space. More roads will create more demand for more cars – and more traffic will soon choke the roads. More laws also create more litigation. This is an excellent example. Mumbai police decided to use an irrelevant and impractical law to create litigation and case load for an overworked judiciary – and possibly an ‘opportunity’ for corruption.

    More police also similarly creates more crime. Police will find a larger spectrum of actions to criminalize – which will engender more crime, which will create more laws, leading to more litigation and crime.

    The way to increase effectiveness of our police force is to reduce the number of laws itself, under which police and judicial workload increases. Decrease his work load – by not having outdated, malevolent, colonial laws on our statute books.

  3. Galeo Rhinus
    November 9, 2009 at 3:49 am

    I like Dan Brown’s definition of religion in his new book…

    …the prerequisite for an ideology to be considered a religion are the ABCs. A religion Assures salvation; religions Believe in a precise theology; and religions Convert non-believers.

    Effective in its simplicity…

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