Home > Europe, History, India, Politics > 2ndlook does not want the Kohinoor back in India!

2ndlook does not want the Kohinoor back in India!


The world’s most precious diamond - Count Wittelsbach-Graff diamond; from the famed Golkonda mines.

The world’s most precious diamond - Count Wittelsbach-Graff diamond; from the famed Golkonda mines. (Image courtesy - The Voice of Russia)

Keith Vaz, the Indian-origin British MP, wants the Kohinoor diamond to be returned to India and asks Prime Minister David Cameron to discuss the issue of its return during his visit to India next week.

Vaz said in a statement: “It would be very fitting for the Kohinoor to return to the country in which it was mined so soon after the diamond jubilee of the Indian republic and 161 years after its removal from India.”

Vaz said the return of the treasure to India would give meaning to the new coalition government’s desire to enter into a new era of partnership with India. “This will certainly convey a new age of Indo-British relations. The prime minister will certainly win the hearts of all Indians if he is prepared to discuss the display of the Kohinoor in India itself, and possibly even its permanent return.”

The diamond was taken to England in 1849 following the defeat of the ruler of the Punjab region, Duleep Singh, and the annexation of the Punjab. As part of the Treaty of Lahore settlement, the gem was surrendered to Queen Victoria. (via Cameron asked to discuss Kohinoor return to India – UK – World – The Times of India).

Maharajah Ranjeet Singh, by Jivan Ram, 1832. Lithograph of watercolor and pencil original, 14.7 x 10.6 cm. (Courtesy - Rita and Gurinder Singh Mann.; photo - Library, University of Berkeley.)

The last Indian 'owner' of the Koh-i-noor - Maharajah Ranjeet Singh, by Jivan Ram, 1832. Lithograph of watercolor and pencil original, 14.7 x 10.6 cm. (Courtesy - Rita and Gurinder Singh Mann.; photo - Library, University of Berkeley.)

Keep the Koh-i-noor

2ndlook would be delighted to let the Koh-i-noor remain in Britain.  In the crown of the British monarch. A symbol of everything British! Of British loot, genocide, bloodshed, exploitation, slavery.

Also a grim reminder of British history to Indians. The loss of the Koh-i-noor and the Orloff diamonds are no loss really. What can India gain by having two more stones – or losing two stones.

Beautiful stones. Granted

Are you serious

If Britain and Keith Vaz is serious about making amends for the loot, just return the many manuscripts that lie (some say secreted) in the basements of British museums and libraries. India’s biggest loss in the years of colonialism was not the Koh-i-noor but the loss of centuries of learning.

Much of that learning is something Indians today do not even know they have lost.

Jefferson’s ‘invisible’ writings

Recently, (claims St.PT Barnum) some unknown writings of Thomas Jefferson have been ‘discovered.’ Written using invisible ink, (claims St.PT Barnum), these writings reveal the ‘true’ nature of Jefferson’s thinking. St.PT barnum with his ‘patented’ anti-propaganda technology, has been able to read the ‘invisible’ portions of the document.

StPT Barnum adds

Indians, remember!

As Thomas Jefferson, an Anglo-Saxon ideologue earlier said, “eternal vigilance is the price of liberty”. The rest of Jefferson’s tract, written in ‘invisible ink, said “If you are fools to trust us, are not vigilant, and gullible enough, we will come and enslave you, exploit you, loot you and rob you.”

Jefferson ended his tract in invisible ink, by writing “Now, all you reds, browns, blacks, yellows, greens! Don’t you ever say that you were not warned!”

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  1. July 26, 2010 at 3:47 pm

    Good Article

  2. samadhyayi
    September 29, 2010 at 2:39 pm

    beek kis ko chahiye. muzhe kohinoor nahin poora england chahiye. ramdev zindabad zisne soctland mey island kareeda hey. uska idea hai ki woh bhi british ki tarah zaise unhone factory banake india ko zeeta. usi tarrah baba ramdev england ko zeetega :>

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