Home > China, India, Indian education, Indian media, Media, Social Trends > Without Comment – How The State Creates Propaganda

Without Comment – How The State Creates Propaganda


How the State promotes our image of Our State and Their State.

Have we got used to spoon-feeding by a hyperactive media? (Cartoon by Don Addis).

Have we got used to spoon-feeding by a hyperactive media? (Cartoon by Don Addis).

in Mumbai now.

To my surprised,most Indian really think India is a democratic country and they are enjoying life and have more human rights than China’s.Most people in India also believe that Chinese live in hell and no freedoms,no human rights etc.On the other side,most people in China believe that India is a “breakfast democracy” which voters will sell their votes only for breakfasts and everbody have the freedom of starving to death.Which side is closer to truths?

via Panorama: Kissinger’s China, India’s Neighbor – India Real Time – WSJ.

  1. Raman
    December 5, 2011 at 6:46 am

    read the article. What’s your take on this observation in the article (China vs India), especially the “escaping colonizing” bit:

    “Again, what seems to make the difference at crucial moments are outstanding stewards, who had conviction in their choices and a willingness to take on entrenched interests for the greater good of the country. It is a history that does stand in sharp contrast to India’s own. Even when surprised by the superior military prowess of the Europeans, China, steered by savvy custodians, managed to emerge out of the turmoil unscathed by full-blown colonization. Rarely does India’s political history have such parallels; and more often than not, its contemporary history is one of even good men failing to stand up for their convictions and ideals, of an absence of thoughtful but combative champions for reforms, political and economic.”

  2. December 5, 2011 at 1:46 pm
    This is the same old story.

    Trying to 2ndguess history.

    To my mind at the dawn of 20th century, China has three major problems.

    1. Gangsterism and Underworld

    2. Large population of drug addicts.

    3. A dysfunctional monarchy

    China has used the USCAP system to make a place for itself at the top – again.

    India in the 20th century had a different set of problems.

    1. Industry – India’s industrial base was shattered and the Indian economy was flat on its back – in a comatose State.

    2. Defence Preparedness– India remained an attractive target for Desert Bloc for its huge labor base; its raw material resources and its still sizable gold reserves. Keeping the Desert Bloc at bay was a formidable task for the Indian State.

    3. Governance – With Bharattantra forgotten; India needed a governance model that was acceptable to Western world. Any non-Western model model would attract unwelcome attentions from the Desert Bloc – like in Libya, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Haiti, Cuba, etc.

    India has managed all the three challenges quite well.

    Thus I think, India and China will manage to regain their positions – only if they do not forget their lessons of History.

    And that is why taking a 2ndloook at history is important – and trying to 2ndguess history is futile.

  3. A Fan of your Blog
    December 6, 2011 at 6:53 pm

    Raman :

    read the article. What’s your take on this observation in the article (China vs India), especially the “escaping colonizing” bit:
    “Again, what seems to make the difference at crucial moments are outstanding stewards, who had conviction in their choices and a willingness to take on entrenched interests for the greater good of the country. It is a history that does stand in sharp contrast to India’s own. Even when surprised by the superior military prowess of the Europeans, China, steered by savvy custodians, managed to emerge out of the turmoil unscathed by full-blown colonization. Rarely does India’s political history have such parallels; and more often than not, its contemporary history is one of even good men failing to stand up for their convictions and ideals, of an absence of thoughtful but combative champions for reforms, political and economic.”

    Some of these points are valid. I cannot compare China to India (since I do not know enough about Chinese history). To draw parallels with Indian history, there never was a Mahabharat to drive the British out of India. Indians (we) did not leverage the distinction between dharma and adharma to adhere to dharma and drive out the adharmic. Even our leaders (Gandhi and Nehru) were England educated and appealed to the “fairness” of the British mind to gain freedom. Non-cooperation is not really a dharmic tool. The Indian independence saga has left a deep-rooted inferiority complex in the Indian mind. Examples are: English-speaking person hold a more elated stature in our society than the vernacular speaker, and fair complexion is better than dark complexion. The British have left, but their language, ideas, systems, sahibgiri, is all still there. Gora sahab has been replaced by a brown sahab.

    If we had fought and won a dharma yuddha, then dharmic ideas would have taken hold, and we would not have gone down this path of moral decay. It is our great tragedy that Sri Krishna has forgotten his promise. There is adharma everywhere and Bhaarat is in glaani, but there are no Sri Krishnas to take us to the path of dharma. In simple words, there is a serious lack of leadership in all spheres of life.

    This is not true just for India, but pretty much all over the world. To stand up for what’s right and do whatever it takes to push it to success has gone out of vogue. A lack of will to do what’s right.

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